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Who made it?

1. Real Life Situation

When I wake up in the morning the only thing I think about is my breakfast. It is hard to decide what to eat because I have lots of choices. Will I eat toast? Maybe cereal? Or eat cheese like in Hungary? Let’s look in the cupboard and see what is inside. It is really important for me to eat a BIG breakfast as I have a lot of things to do everyday.

By lunchtime my stomach is rumbling….(growl growl growl). I look forward to lunch because it means that I can talk with all my friends whilst eating. My lunch looks great. Some of my friends like to eat lots of chips for their lunch, others like to eat an apple. I wonder how they decide what they eat and where their lunch comes from?

Home from school and time for a snack. I have a choice of so many things….orange, banana, crisps, chocolate.

“Dinner time!”  Urrrrgh…not green stuff AGAIN. Why are all the ‘good’ things green? Can’t we eat out instead?

Time for bed, I wonder what I will eat tomorrow?

2. Introduction

f3 image 1Food is produced by many different people who live in different environments and have different lifestyles.  You will investigate the different scales that food is produced on and consider how many people are involved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Task

To carry out a survey of food items present in your kitchen and mark on a map where in the world food has come from.
To consider the eco footprint of a product and develop an understanding of what is involved in the production, use and disposal of a product.
To explore issues relating to Fair Trade in continents such as Africa, find out about the consequences to different people under normal and Fair Trade and discuss choices in relation to buying Fair Trade products
To investigate dairy farming in two countries.

4. Activities

Activity 1: Kitchen food cupboard investigation
Activity 2: The Great Kinder Egg – an Eco Footprint
Activity 3: Chocolate Consequences Trade Game


 Activity 1: Kitchen food cupboard investigation

Carry out a survey of food items present in your kitchen and mark on a map where in the world food has come from.

Instructions:

Print the Kitchen food investigation worksheet .

Take the worksheet home and carry out a survey of the food items in your kitchen cupboard.

Write each food item in the correct column and look at food package labels or ask an adult to help you find where in the world it comes from.   Record this information in the table as well.

Print the Map of the world

Plot the country of origin for your food items.

Think about which item has travelled furthest.

Think about why food has come from a particular location.

Bring the survey and map back to school and be prepared to discuss the results with the rest of the class.


 Activity 2: The Great Kinder Egg – an Eco Footprint

A Kinder Egg - consider the eco footprint made by tracing the journey of each part from the raw materials to the consumer and then how the waste is disposed of.

Instructions:

Work in a small group of 4 or 5, sitting round a table or work area

Find a picture of a Kinder Egg on the internet showing all the different parts (or use the Kinder Egg provided by your teacher, break it up and identify its different parts)

Discuss in your group and investigate on the internet what raw materials the different parts are made up of. 

You can use the card sort to help you match the raw materials to the product.

Print and cut out the activity cards so that your group has a set of Transportation, Extraction, Processing / Manufacture and Distribution cards.

Or

Keep the document open so that you can look at the cards for the next section.

Place the different parts of the Kinder Egg in the centre of the table and build up lines of cards to show what is involved in the production of each of the different parts – from raw materials to end product. 

Or

Place or draw the different parts of the Kinder Egg on a large piece of paper and draw lines to show what is involved in the production of each of the different parts – from raw materials to end product.

There should be lines for producing the aluminium foil, the plastic toy, the cocoa, milk and sugar for the chocolate. 

Compare and discuss your answers with other groups.

Discuss what is involved in the disposal of the product.

 

This activity is based on an original activity developed by the Centre for Alternative Technology.


 Activity 3: Chocolate Consequences Trade Game

You will become characters in the chocolate production chain from an African farmer to a UK shopper. Each person will get monthly wages according to set rules. The game is carried out under normal and Fair Trade rules and you will compare the money your character earns under these different conditions.

Instructions:

Part 1: Chocolate survey (optional)

You are going to be looking at chocolate and where it comes from.

Work in a small group of 4 or 5 and write a list of the three most popular chocolate bars.


Part 2: Chocolate chain

Draw a flow diagram of the chain of chocolate production

It should include the people involved and the country where they live.

Start “cocoa beans” and finish “chocolate bar in your hand”.

Feedback your results to your teacher.


Part 3a: Consequences Trade Game

Open the character cards – your teacher will tell you which character you will be playing, who they are and where they live.  Draw a picture of your character. 

Print and write or open and type into the recording sheets 

Your teacher will tell you your characters starting salary.

The game is played over a number of rounds.  Each round represents a month of the year. At the beginning of each round, you will be given the wages for that month.

Record your monthly earnings on your recording sheet.

At the end of the game discuss some of the issues raised - what was the problem?


Part 3b: Consequences Trade Game

Use the internet to investigate Fair Trade click here , here and here.

You will play the game again but this time under Fair Trade Rules.

At the end of the game discuss the differences.

5. Reflection

Write down three things you have learnt about who makes our food.

Write down two things you would like to find out more about.

Choose one of these things, how could you find out more about it?


Food and Drink learning wall

6. Conclusion

Through this webquest you have thought about where food comes from and what goes into the manufacturing of some products. You have also thought about the people involved in the manufacture and supply of the food we consume. Some things in your kitchen cupboards have travelled a long way.

7. Teacher notes

Age: 8 - 12

Time:

Activity 1: Kitchen food cupboard investigation (30 minutes)
Activity 2: The Great Kinder Egg – an Eco Footprint (45 minutes)
Activity 3: Chocolate Consequences Trade Game (1 hour)

Curriculum / Subject (cross-curricular links):
Geography
Sustainability
Mathematics

Learning objectives:

By the end of the quest all students will:
Explain that food is made by many different people.
Describe different lifestyles that people may have.
Compare the lives of different people and evaluate preferred lifestyles.
Present opinions about how they prefer their food to be grown.

Supporting Information

The Kinder Egg activity is based on an activity developed by the Centre for Alternative Technology.

You can access a full version of this activity here.

Teacher assesment framework

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